MARIUPOL: the name of a city etched in history with the blood of its people

There are some cities and places whose names we will always associate with a historical event. World War II left us many such recollections by association: The siege of Leningrad; the battle of Stalingrad, the siege of Malta - to name a few.

It seems that another European city has now etched its name in history by the blood of its people. The Ukrainian City Port of Mariupol was until two weeks ago a peaceful home to half a million peaceful Ukrainians. Then Russia invaded, and Mariupol became a prime objective for the invaders. The reason is its geographic location on the Sea of Azov, which Moscow wants to turn into a Russian inner Sea. In this scheme there is no place for a Ukrainian Mariupol, in the same way as in the scheme of president Putin for the neighbourhood of Russia there is no place for Ukraine.

What we have seen in the last two weeks is relentless bombardment of Mariupol. Its civilian citizens have not been allowed to flee and instead they have been subjected to relentless bombardment. Yesterday, it was the turn of the city's maternity hospital to be bombed. This was no error. Hours before a Russian official had singled out the building as a potential hideout for Ukrainian partisans, something that has not been proven by anyone. Instead when the hospital was bombed it was pregnant women and babies that were the victims.

The war in Ukraine is likely to continue for some time, and after that it will be an uneasy peace that will follow. For Ukrainians this is an existential battle - whether they want their country to continue to live. For the Kremlin it is existential too. A humiliating defeat in Ukraine will seriously undermine the legitimacy of the regime. There are therefore likely to be many battles ahead, many heroic Ukrainian cities to add to the catalogue of history. But for sure Mariupol's name will forever be associated with the heroism of its people, with the war crimes committed by the Kremlin in Ukraine, and with the futility and irrationality of war.

source: This editorial was prepared by the editorial team of commonspace.eu
photo: The Maternity Hospital in the Ukrainian city port of Mariupol was bombed on 9 March 2022

 

Related articles

Editor's choice
News
Borrell tells the European Parliament that the situation in Afghanistan was critical, but the EU will remain engaged

Borrell tells the European Parliament that the situation in Afghanistan was critical, but the EU will remain engaged

Borrell underlined that the European Union will make every effort to support the peace process and to remain a committed partner to the Afghan people. "Of course, we will have to take into account the evolving situation, but disengagement is not an option.  We are clear on that: there is no alternative to a negotiated political settlement, through inclusive peace talks.
Editor's choice
News
Thousands killed and injured as massive earthquake hits Turkey and Syria

Thousands killed and injured as massive earthquake hits Turkey and Syria

A magnitude 7.8 earthquake has struck southern Turkey and Syria, killing and injuring thousands of people. The earthquake, which struck at 04.17 local time on Monday (6 February), was followed 11 minutes later by a magnitude 6.7 aftershock. The number of dead and injured is rising rapidly. As of 08.15 CET, citing Turkey's Vice President Fuat Oktay, the BBC reports that the death toll in Turkey has risen to 284, with 2,323 people injured. At least 200 people have been killed and over 600 injured in government-held regions of Syria. The number of dead and injured in rebel-held areas is currently unknown. The epicentre was approximately 20km west of the city of Gaziantep, and was felt as far away as Lebanon, Israel and Cyprus. Italy also released a tsunami warning soon after the quake struck, but it has since been lifted. In apocalyptic scenes resembling war-torn Ukraine, footage on social media has shown collapsed buildings and people stuck under rubble calling for help. Rows of tower blocks in major cities across Turkey have been levelled, and in rebel-held northern Syria, the situation is likely to be significantly worsened due to limited access to healthcare and poor living conditions.

Popular

Editor's choice
News
Thousands killed and injured as massive earthquake hits Turkey and Syria

Thousands killed and injured as massive earthquake hits Turkey and Syria

A magnitude 7.8 earthquake has struck southern Turkey and Syria, killing and injuring thousands of people. The earthquake, which struck at 04.17 local time on Monday (6 February), was followed 11 minutes later by a magnitude 6.7 aftershock. The number of dead and injured is rising rapidly. As of 08.15 CET, citing Turkey's Vice President Fuat Oktay, the BBC reports that the death toll in Turkey has risen to 284, with 2,323 people injured. At least 200 people have been killed and over 600 injured in government-held regions of Syria. The number of dead and injured in rebel-held areas is currently unknown. The epicentre was approximately 20km west of the city of Gaziantep, and was felt as far away as Lebanon, Israel and Cyprus. Italy also released a tsunami warning soon after the quake struck, but it has since been lifted. In apocalyptic scenes resembling war-torn Ukraine, footage on social media has shown collapsed buildings and people stuck under rubble calling for help. Rows of tower blocks in major cities across Turkey have been levelled, and in rebel-held northern Syria, the situation is likely to be significantly worsened due to limited access to healthcare and poor living conditions.