Region

South Caucasus

Stories under this heading cover the South Caucasus – a region encompassing Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia, as well as the unrecognised entities of Abkhazia, South Ossetia, and Nagorno-Karabakh.

For those interested specifically in Armenian-Azerbaijani relations and events and developments in and around Nagorno-Karabakh following the 2020 44-day war, check out our sister page, KarabakhSpace.eu.

Editor's choice
Opinion
Opinion: In the South Caucasus there is a new hope for peace

Opinion: In the South Caucasus there is a new hope for peace

For the first time in decades, in the South Caucasus there is a new hope for peace. In separate articles for our sister website, Karabakhspace.eu, Benyamin Poghosyan and Vasif Huseynov discuss recent developments, including the emerging role of Georgia as a trusted intermediary.
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News
Thousands rally in Tbilisi calling for the release of former president Saakashvili

Thousands rally in Tbilisi calling for the release of former president Saakashvili

Saakashvili remains popular with some segments of Georgian society, particularly in Western Georgia. Thousands travelled to Tbilisi to participate in the rally. However many Georgians have negative memories of Saakashvili's presidency and do not want to see his return to public office.

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Editor's choice
News
Georgian forces start withdrawing from Afghanistan

Georgian forces start withdrawing from Afghanistan

More than 20,000 Georgian servicemen have participated in the mission in Afghanistan since 2004, usually serving six monthly rotations.  Predominantly tasked with peacekeeping in the volatile Helmand province, Georgia was the largest non-NATO, as well as largest per-capita, contributor to ISAF mission. Dozens of Georgian soldiers were killed or injured during the Afghanistan operation.
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News
Lavrov proposes Russia participates in new Commission between Armenia and Azerbaijan on border demarcation

Lavrov proposes Russia participates in new Commission between Armenia and Azerbaijan on border demarcation

Russia has in recent months already become deeply entangled in Armenia-Azerbaijan relations, following the signing of the 10 November trilateral agreement that ended the 44 day Karabakh War. Russia has deployed thousands of soldiers, border guards, FSB officers, sappers, Ministry for Emergency Situations personnel and others to Nagorno-Karabakh and the southern border between Armenia and Azerbaijan since last November.
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Commentary
Commentary: Lavrov's travels and travails in the South Caucasus

Commentary: Lavrov's travels and travails in the South Caucasus

The Russian foreign minister, Sergei Lavrov, was in Armenia and in Azerbaijan in the last days. Bilateral issues were discussed in both Baku and Yerevan during his visit, however, it was the regional situation that dominated the discussions in both capitals, and in particular, the implementation in practice of the 10 November “Trilateral Declaration” signed by Armenia, Azerbaijan and Russia. This is proving easier said than done, and some are asking if Russia has not taken on a poisoned chalice.
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News
Regional issues dominate Armenian-Georgian talks in Yerevan

Regional issues dominate Armenian-Georgian talks in Yerevan

The Georgian prime minister, Irakli Garibashvili, was in Yerevan on Wednesday (12 May) for talks with his Armenian counterpart and other officials. It is a tradition that a new Georgian leader, on taking office, visits the two neighbouring countries, Armenia and Azerbaijan. Garibashvili was in Baku a week before. Armenia and Georgia renewed their commitment to working together to develop bilateral relations in many fields, but there was also considerable emphasis put on regional co-operation.
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Opinion
Opinion: “All against all” or “all against Nikol”?

Opinion: “All against all” or “all against Nikol”?

Alliances are being formed between Armenian political parties ahead of the 20 June parliamentary elections. Whilst they all claim to want to oust the current prime minister, Nikol Pashinyan, they are all also busy competing against each other. Despite this, the next Armenian government is likely to be a coalition government, argues Benyamin Poghosyan in this op-ed for commonspace.eu