Orban says that Hungary will not leave the EU but wants to reform it

On Sunday (14 November), Hungarian Prime Minister, Viktor Orbán, told the congress of the ruling Fidesz party that Hungary does not want to leave the European Union, but continues to oppose Brussels' attempts to erode the country's sovereignty. At the congress, he was re-elected as party leader. 

"After the communist bureaucracy, we do not want new dictates this time from Brussels", Orbán told his party colleagues, adding that Hungary does not like Western liberalism. 

"We will not give up the right to defend our borders, to stop migrants… we insist that marriage in Hungary is between a man and a woman, a father is a man and a mother is a woman … and they should leave our children alone".

Orbán also said that the European Union must be reformed and that Hungary's goal is to bring about that change and not to turn its back on the union, of which it has been a member since 2004. "We don't want to leave the EU at all, they can't get rid of us so easily", he said. "We want to keep our sovereignty and we don't want to find ourselves in a united states of Europe, instead of integration".

Orbán has been in power in Hungary since 2010. Next year in April, parliamentary elections will be held in the country. 

 

source: commonspace.eu with Euronews and agencies
photo: The Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán. Reuters

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