Sudan's main pro-democracy faction agrees to participate in UN talks

The prominent Sudanese pro-democracy coalition, Forces of Freedom and Change has accepted the UN’s offer to broker an end to political deadlock following the October military coup and the resignation of prime minister Abdulla Hamdok earlier in January. 

Jaafar Hassan, a spokesperson for the Central Council for the Forces of Freedom and Change (CCFFC), said in a press statement on Sunday (16 January) that the council decided to accept the invitation of the United Nations mission in Sudan (UNITAMS) to support dialogue between the parties to the Sudanese crisis.

Read the UNITAMS statements on dialogue here

Hassan said a delegation from the CCFFC will meet with UNITAMS to deliver the coalition’s vision regarding the initiative for dialogue between the various Sudanese parties.

The Sudanese Professionals Association, however, has rejected the UN’s offer for dialogue. 

The Sudanese political crisis got even worse when the prime minister decided to resign after being reinstated in November but the pro-democracy movement denounced that agreement, insisting that power be handed over to a fully civilian government. Hamdok attributed longstanding disagreements with the military rulers and the slow pace of reforms as the reason for his final decision of resignation. 

The African Union has played a role in brokering between political factions in Sudan. In addition, 
David Satterfield, the new US envoy to the Horn of Africa, is expected to visit Sudan next week where he and US Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs Molly Phee will meet military and political figures as well as pro-democracy activists.

Source: commonspace.eu with Al Jazeera (Doha) and Al-Monitor (Washington DC). 
Picture: Special Representative of the Secretary-General of the United Nations and Head of UNITAMS, Volker Perthes; Twitter: @UNITAMS. 

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