Repression and executions continue in Iran as regime struggles to contain protests

Iran's clerical dictatorship has unleashed another wave of repression and executions in an effort to contain protests that continue unabbetted across the country.

Iran’s judiciary announced on Sunday four people had been jailed for up to 10 years for calling for strikes in support of ongoing nationwide protests against the regime.

It is the first time the judiciary has announced prison sentences for such an act during demonstrations triggered by the death of Mahsa Amini at the hands of the morality police in September. Activists used social media early last month to call for a three-day nationwide strike in support of the protesters. 

The judiciary’s Mizan Online news website said that the four defendants had been jailed for between one and 10 years. They were not identified and may still appeal.

Mojtaba Ghahramani, head of the judiciary for Iran’s southern province of Hormozgan, told Mizan that the four were sentenced principally “for having incited drivers to strike,” and for vandalism.

“None of the defendants is a driver or has anything to do with the transport sector,” he said. “One was sentenced to 10 years’ imprisonment and another to five years for forming a group with the aim of disrupting national security,” Ghahramani said.

Two others were jailed for a year and fined for “disturbing public order and destroying truck windows,” he said.

Last month local media reported that authorities sealed a jewelry shop and restaurant in Tehran belonging to footballer Ali Daei, after he backed the protesters’ strike calls.

Four men, including two on Saturday, have been executed for killing and wounding security force members in connection with the protests.

Twenty-six further prisoners are currently awaiting execution. They were sentenced to death in show trials meant to intimidate the population and put an end to the protests. At least 11 people have been sentenced to death, and another 15 have been accused of crimes that are punishable by death in Iran — including waging "war against God".

Writer and illustrator Mehdi Bahman is among them. He was sentenced to death by a court in Tehran after giving an interview with Israeli media.

Bahman, who has spent much of his life advocating for interfaith dialogue and peace, had endorsed normalizing ties between Israel and Iran. Mehdi Bahman was arrested in October and charged with espionage. In December, without legal council, he was sentenced to death. Iran's rulers have accused foreign powers of instigating the protests throughout the country.

source: commonspace.eu with agencies and Deutsche Welle (Cologne);

Related articles

Editor's choice
News
Borrell tells the European Parliament that the situation in Afghanistan was critical, but the EU will remain engaged

Borrell tells the European Parliament that the situation in Afghanistan was critical, but the EU will remain engaged

Borrell underlined that the European Union will make every effort to support the peace process and to remain a committed partner to the Afghan people. "Of course, we will have to take into account the evolving situation, but disengagement is not an option.  We are clear on that: there is no alternative to a negotiated political settlement, through inclusive peace talks.
Editor's choice
News
Thousands killed and injured as massive earthquake hits Turkey and Syria

Thousands killed and injured as massive earthquake hits Turkey and Syria

A magnitude 7.8 earthquake has struck southern Turkey and Syria, killing and injuring thousands of people. The earthquake, which struck at 04.17 local time on Monday (6 February), was followed 11 minutes later by a magnitude 6.7 aftershock. The number of dead and injured is rising rapidly. As of 08.15 CET, citing Turkey's Vice President Fuat Oktay, the BBC reports that the death toll in Turkey has risen to 284, with 2,323 people injured. At least 200 people have been killed and over 600 injured in government-held regions of Syria. The number of dead and injured in rebel-held areas is currently unknown. The epicentre was approximately 20km west of the city of Gaziantep, and was felt as far away as Lebanon, Israel and Cyprus. Italy also released a tsunami warning soon after the quake struck, but it has since been lifted. In apocalyptic scenes resembling war-torn Ukraine, footage on social media has shown collapsed buildings and people stuck under rubble calling for help. Rows of tower blocks in major cities across Turkey have been levelled, and in rebel-held northern Syria, the situation is likely to be significantly worsened due to limited access to healthcare and poor living conditions.

Popular

Editor's choice
News
Thousands killed and injured as massive earthquake hits Turkey and Syria

Thousands killed and injured as massive earthquake hits Turkey and Syria

A magnitude 7.8 earthquake has struck southern Turkey and Syria, killing and injuring thousands of people. The earthquake, which struck at 04.17 local time on Monday (6 February), was followed 11 minutes later by a magnitude 6.7 aftershock. The number of dead and injured is rising rapidly. As of 08.15 CET, citing Turkey's Vice President Fuat Oktay, the BBC reports that the death toll in Turkey has risen to 284, with 2,323 people injured. At least 200 people have been killed and over 600 injured in government-held regions of Syria. The number of dead and injured in rebel-held areas is currently unknown. The epicentre was approximately 20km west of the city of Gaziantep, and was felt as far away as Lebanon, Israel and Cyprus. Italy also released a tsunami warning soon after the quake struck, but it has since been lifted. In apocalyptic scenes resembling war-torn Ukraine, footage on social media has shown collapsed buildings and people stuck under rubble calling for help. Rows of tower blocks in major cities across Turkey have been levelled, and in rebel-held northern Syria, the situation is likely to be significantly worsened due to limited access to healthcare and poor living conditions.