Estonia calls up 1700 reservists for a military exercise near the Russian border

The Estonian government summoned 1,684 military reservists to an unannounced exercise along its border with neighbouring Russia.

In a statement published on the government's website on Wednesday (17 November), it was announced that the reservists are said to deploy along the more than 40-kilometre-long border which is already protected by barbed wire barrier. The exercise is taking place as the migration crisis in Eastern Europe, especially on the border between Poland and Belarus, continues.

The exercise will last from 17 November to 25 November and is intended to test the "responsiveness of the national chain of command", the statement said. Strengthening the infrastructure on the borders with Russia is necessary "in view of the developments in Poland, Lithuania and Latvia".

The situation on the border between Belarus and Poland also remains tense. Belarus is allowing migrants and asylum seekers to fly in Belarus where they are then driven to the borders with the European Union. According to the EU, the President of Belarus, Alexander Lukashenko, is trying in this way to force the lifting of sanctions against his regime, although he himself denies this. 
 

source: commonspace.eu with Reuters, The Estonian Government and agencies
photo: Estonian soldiers on an exercise. The image is illustrative. Estonian Defence Forces

Related articles

Editor's choice
News
Borrell tells the European Parliament that the situation in Afghanistan was critical, but the EU will remain engaged

Borrell tells the European Parliament that the situation in Afghanistan was critical, but the EU will remain engaged

Borrell underlined that the European Union will make every effort to support the peace process and to remain a committed partner to the Afghan people. "Of course, we will have to take into account the evolving situation, but disengagement is not an option.  We are clear on that: there is no alternative to a negotiated political settlement, through inclusive peace talks.
Editor's choice
News
New report reveals climate impact of Russia's war in Ukraine: $32 billion damage over two years

New report reveals climate impact of Russia's war in Ukraine: $32 billion damage over two years

Russia's ongoing full-scale war in Ukraine, initiated on 24 February 2022, has caused significant environmental and climate damage, severely impacting global efforts to combat climate change. This is highlighted in the latest report from the Initiative on Greenhouse Gas Accounting of War (IGGAW), which analyses the environmental costs over the past two years. The report was published Thursday (13 June) by the Ministry for Environmental Protection and Natural Resources of Ukraine in collaboration with climate advocacy groups. The IGGAW report estimates climate-related damages at $32 billion, attributed to activities such as the extensive use of military fuels and the destruction of landscapes and infrastructure. Over 24 months, the conflict resulted in the emission of 175 million tonnes of carbon dioxide - more than the annual emissions of a developed country like the Netherlands.

Popular

Editor's choice
News
New report reveals climate impact of Russia's war in Ukraine: $32 billion damage over two years

New report reveals climate impact of Russia's war in Ukraine: $32 billion damage over two years

Russia's ongoing full-scale war in Ukraine, initiated on 24 February 2022, has caused significant environmental and climate damage, severely impacting global efforts to combat climate change. This is highlighted in the latest report from the Initiative on Greenhouse Gas Accounting of War (IGGAW), which analyses the environmental costs over the past two years. The report was published Thursday (13 June) by the Ministry for Environmental Protection and Natural Resources of Ukraine in collaboration with climate advocacy groups. The IGGAW report estimates climate-related damages at $32 billion, attributed to activities such as the extensive use of military fuels and the destruction of landscapes and infrastructure. Over 24 months, the conflict resulted in the emission of 175 million tonnes of carbon dioxide - more than the annual emissions of a developed country like the Netherlands.