Anakonda-23 NATO exercises underway in Poland

The Anakonda-23 NATO military exercises in Poland began on Saturday (6 May).

Polskie Radio reports that around 13,000 Polish servicemen are taking part in the exercises in southeastern Poland. These exercises take place every three years, with this year's focus on defence and deterrence in the Baltic Sea region.

The United States, Romania, Slovenia, Sweden, France, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Turkey are participating in both the Anakonda-23 exercises in Poland, and in the concurrent Aurora-23 exercises in Sweden about which you can read more here

Although the preparations for Anakonda-23 began in 2021, the full-scale Russian invasion of Ukraine in February 2022 has posed new challenges to Europe's defense and security architecture, reportedly resulting in changes made to manoeuvers in the exercises according to Radio Svoboda.

Poland has been urged not to publish information regarding the movement and dislocation of the military during the exercises.

"Do not report the places, dates, and times of military convoys. Any ill-advised action online, especially considering the current geopolitical situation in the world, and information about important military objects, systems, and devices can have negative consequences for the security and defense systems," the statement released by the Polish military reads.

source: commonspace.eu with agencies
photo: Ministry of Defense of Poland

 

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